Sign In

1970

Text Size a a a Print Print this page

The 1970s galvanised women into political action more than any decade before: it was the era of `Women's Liberation'.  With the voting age lowered from 21 to 18 in 1971, more women than ever were adding their voices to the ongoing debate about women's issues.

Protest March 

Courtesy of The West Australian

A new branch of the long running Women's Service Guilds, called the Harvest Guild, was formed in 1972.  The President, Wendy Fatin, appeared
in a controversial television interview to advocate legislation for the advertising of contraceptives.  She went on to become the Federal Member for Canning, then Brand, and was appointed Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Status of Women.

Another organisation formed in the early 70s was the Women's Electoral Lobby.  One of the original members was Dot Goodrick, who later became the Lobby's

The 1970s galvanised women into political action more than any decade before: it was the era of `Women's Liberation'.

representative to the Fraser Government.  The Lobby aimed to give women more power, challenge the male monopoly on public decision making, obtain private and public equality for women, educate political candidates on women's issues, and obtain workplace reforms such as maternity leave and child care.

On the world stage, 1975 was designated International Women's Year and the start of the United Nation's Decade for Women.  The decade ended with Margaret Thatcher being elected the British Prime Minister.