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Celebrating a New Start

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Proclamation Day, Fremantle
People lined the High Street of Fremantle to celebrate Proclamation Day and the town was decorated with flags and bunting.
Proclamation Tree, Fremantle
Proclamation Tree, Fremantle
The tree planted by the Governor
Proclamation Day invitation
Bunbury Celebration
This was one of the few celebrations where Aboriginals were invited to participate.

People welcomed the change to self-government throughout the colony.

Towns and settlements across the colony held their own Proclamation ceremonies.

Governor Robinson, travelled to Fremantle the day after festivities in Perth.  The people of Fremantle lined the streets and marched in a civic procession.

 

The port town's celebrations were elaborate and included the ceremonial planting of a "Proclamation Tree", which still stands today.

"Under the new Constitution the Government will be largely in the hands of the people and with the enthusiasm of hope we are persuaded that... the Colony will make rapid progress in all those interests that build up a prosperous and happy community and that Western Australia will then take her proper place in that Federation of the Australian Colonies which seems to be rapidly approaching."

Inquirer and Commercial News, 24 October 1890

"At Geraldton a large crowd of 'mourners' pretended to 'bury' the 'old constitution'. Bearers carried a huge coffin to the ground, where a grave was dug and coloured lights were burning".

 

West Australian,  24 October 1890

 

​Proclamation Festivities

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VISIT OF THE GOVERNOR

TO FREMANTLE

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THE DECORATIONS

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THE RECEPTION AT THE RAILWAY

STATION.

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PROCEEDINGS AT THE TOWN HALL.

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THE PLANTING OF THE PROCLAMATION TREE.

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THE SPORTS.

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TORCHLIGHT PROCESSION AND FIREWORKS.

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AN ENTHUSIASTIC WELCOME.

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On Wednesday Fremantle was en fete, in anticipation of the visit of the Governor.

THE WEATHER.

The morning opened unfavourably, with occasional showers and heavy gusts of wind.  Unfortunately one of these blew down the triumphal arch, at 8 a.m.  All possible haste was made to repair the damage, and the arch was re-erected at about 11 o'clock.  From 9 a.m. the weather commenced to clear, and the sun shone brightly.  The weather during the remainder of the day was fresh and bracing, and was succeeded by a fine moonlight night.

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